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Advanced Level Organic Chemistry: 15.5 UV and Visible Spectroscopy

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PART 15.5 Ultraviolet & visible spectroscopy

15.5.3 uv-visible absorption spectra and more on the chemistry of colour - example of uses and applications explained

Doc Brown's Chemistry Advanced Level Pre-University Chemistry Revision Study Notes for UK IB KS5 A/AS GCE advanced A level organic chemistry students US K12 grade 11 grade 12 organic chemistry courses Spectroscopic methods of analysis and molecular structure determination

All my advanced A level organic chemistry notes

SPECTROSCOPY INDEXES

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15.5.1 The origin of colour, the wavelengths of visible light, our perception!

15.5.2 uv-visible spectroscopy theory, spectrometer, examples of absorption & reflectance spectra explained

15.5.3 uv-visible absorption spectra - index of examples: uses, applications, more chemistry of colour (this page)


15.5.3 uv-visible absorption spectra - index of examples: uses, applications, more on the chemistry of colour

Sub-index for this page

(a) More examples of organic molecule absorption spectra

(b) More examples of inorganic uv-visible absorption spectra (mainly transition metal ion complexes)

(c) Examples of applications of uv-visible absorption spectra in chemical analysis and identification

(d) Examples of applications of uv-visible absorption spectra in chemical kinetics

(e) The analytical uses of flame emission and absorption spectroscopy


(a) More examples of organic molecule absorption spectra

02 The uv-visible absorption spectra of alkenes

07 The uv-visible absorption spectra of selected aromatic compounds - arenes

03 The uv-visible absorption spectrum of chlorophyll, photosynthesis (porphyrin pigment)

04 The uv-visible absorption spectra of the photopigments in the human eye

09 The uv-visible absorption spectra of some acid-alkali titration indicators

11 The uv-visible absorption spectra of some azo dyes

14 The uv-visible absorption spectra of some phenols

15 The uv-visible absorption spectrum of methylene blue

16 The uv-visible absorption spectrum of haemoglobin (porphyrin pigment)

17 The uv-visible absorption spectrum of melanin pigments


(b) More examples of inorganic absorption spectra (mainly transition metal ion complexes)

08 The uv-visible absorption spectra of some copper complex ions

01 The uv-visible absorption spectra of some cobalt complex ions

05 The uv-visible absorption spectra of selected titanium complex ions

12 The uv-visible absorption spectra of selected nickel complex ions

13 The uv-visible absorption spectra of selected manganese complex ions

06 The uv-visible absorption spectra of some chromium ions

10 The uv-visible absorption spectra of the Group 7/17 Halogens


(c) Examples of applications in analysis and identification

Previously written ....

Identifying and element analysis from emission spectroscopy and flame photometry

Colorimetric analysis and determining a transition metal complex ion formula


(d) Examples of applications in chemical kinetics

A change in reactant or product concentration can make the basis of studying the rate of a chemical reaction.

Ideally, a single coloured reactant changes into a colourless product, or,

colourless reactants produce one coloured product.

The concentration of the coloured reactant or product can be followed by sampling the reaction mixture and measuring the absorbance at appropriate time intervals.

using colorimetry to monitor the rate of reaction graphs of absorbance versus time calibrated to concentartion versus time kinetics investigation

The two graphs above might represent results for a 1st order reaction.

The graphs assume

(i) Only one reactant is coloured and forms a colourless product, so absorbance decreases with time.

(ii) The absorbance is proportional to the concentration of the coloured reactant.

Graph A represents the raw data i.e. measuring the absorbance of samples removed from the reaction mixture - this must be done quickly and efficiently.

From the graph A data and a concentration versus absorbance calibration curve you can then convert absorbance to a concentration to give graph A.

The graph data (and other sets)  can then be analysed just like any other sets of kinetics data to determine the order of reaction and rate constant.

See Advanced A level chemistry notes - sections 5. to 7.



SPECTROSCOPY INDEXES

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