Doc Brown's Chemistry  Cambridge 0652 IGCSE Physical Science

Helps the CHEMISTRY of the Cambridge IGCSE Physical Science 0652 CIE syllabus-specification

Cambridge International Certificate of Education (ICE) For examination in November 2012 and November 2013

[Each link opens up in a new window]  *  CHEMISTRY HELP LINKS and  PHYSICS

[ALL LINKS SHOULD WORK IF THIS PAGE IS SAVED]


Other Cambridge IGCSE/O Level International Syllabuses: 0620 * 0653 * 0654 * 5070 * 5129


CHEMISTRY 0652 Curriculum core content and supplements

It is important that, throughout this section, attention should be drawn to:

the finite life of the world’s resources and hence the need for recycling and conservation

economic considerations in the chemical industry, such as the availability and cost of raw materials and energy the importance of chemicals in industry and in everyday life.

C1.The particulate nature of matter

1 describe the states of matter and explain their interconversion in terms of the kinetic particle theory

2 describe diffusion and Brownian motion in terms of kinetic theory

C2. Experimental techniques

1 name appropriate apparatus for the measurement of time, temperature, mass and volume, including burettes, pipettes and measuring cylinders

2 describe paper chromatography (including the use of locating agents) and interpret simple chromatograms

3 recognise that mixtures melt and boil over a range of temperatures

4 describe methods of purification by the use of a suitable solvent, filtration, crystallisation, distillation (including use of fractionating column.

Refer to the fractional distillation of crude oil (petroleum – section 11.2) and fermented liquor (section 11.6)

C3. Atoms, elements and compounds

3.1 Atomic structure and the Periodic Table

1 state the relative charge and approximate relative mass of a proton, a neutron and an electron

2 define proton number and nucleon number

3 use proton number and the simple structure of atoms to explain the basis of the Periodic Table (section 7.1 to 7.4), with special reference to the elements of proton number 1 to 20

4 use the notation abX for an atom

5 describe the build-up of electrons in 'shells' and understand the significance of the noble gas electronic structures and of outer electrons

The ideas of the distribution of electrons in s- and p-orbitals and in d-block elements are not required.

Note that a copy of the Periodic Table, will be provided in Papers 1, 2 and 3.

6 define isotopes

3.2 Bonding: the structure of matter

1 describe the differences between elements, mixtures and compounds, and between metals and non-metals (section 7.1)

2 describe alloys, such as brass, as mixtures of a metal with other elements

3 explain how alloying affects the properties of metals (see 3.2 (d))

3.2(a) Ions and ionic bonds

1 describe the formation of ions by electron loss or gain describe the formation of ionic bonds between the alkali metals and the
halogens

2 describe the formation of ionic bonds between metallic and non-metallic elements

3.2(b) Molecules and covalent bonds

1 describe the formation of single covalent bonds in H2, Cl2, H2O, CH4 and HCl as the sharing of pairs of electrons leading to the noble gas configuration

2 describe the electron arrangement in more complex covalent molecules such as N2, C2H2, CH3OH and CO2

3 describe the differences in volatility, solubility and electrical conductivity between ionic and covalent compounds

3.2 (c) Macromolecules

1 describe the structure of graphite and of diamond

2 relate these structures to melting point, conductivity and hardness

3.2 (d) Metallic bonding

1 describe metallic bonding as a lattice of positive ions in a 'sea of electrons' and use this to explain the electrical conductivity and malleability of metals

C4. Stoichiometry

1 use the symbols of the elements and write the formulae of simple compounds

2 determine the formula of an ionic compound from the charges on the ions present

3 deduce the formula of a simple compound from the relative numbers of atoms present

4 deduce the balanced equation of a chemical reaction, given relevant information

5 construct word equations and simple balanced chemical equations

6 define relative atomic mass, Ar

7 define relative molecular mass, Mr , and calculate it as the sum of the relative atomic masses (the term relative formula mass or Mr will be used for ionic compounds)

8 calculate stoichiometric reacting masses and volumes of gases and solutions, solution concentrations expressed in g/dm3 and mol/dm3

Calculations based on limiting reactants may be set; questions on the gas laws and the conversion of gaseous volumes to different temperatures and pressures will not be set.

C5. Chemical reactions

5.1 Production of energy

1 describe the production of heat energy by burning fuels

2 describe hydrogen as a fuel

3 describe radioactive isotopes, such as 235U, as a source of energy

5.2 Energetics of a reaction

1 describe the meaning of exothermic and endothermic reactions

2 describe bond breaking as endothermic and bond forming as exothermic

Notes on Energy changes-transfers in Chemical Reactions - Exothermic and endothermic energy changes

5.3 Speed of reaction

1 describe the effects of concentration, particle size, catalysts (including enzymes) and temperature on the speeds of reactions

2 show awareness that light can provide the energy needed for a chemical reaction to occur

3 state that organic compounds that catalyse organic reactions are called enzymes

4 state that photosynthesis leads to the production of glucose from carbon dioxide and water in the presence of chlorophyll and sunlight (energy)

5 describe the application of the above factors to the danger of explosive combustion with fine powders (e.g. flour mills) and gases (e.g. mines)

6 describe the use of silver salts in photography (i.e. reduction of silver ions to silver)

5.4 Redox

1 define oxidation and reduction in terms of oxygen gain / loss

Introduction to OXIDATION and REDUCTION and their application to REDOX reactions

C6. Acids, bases and salts

6.1 The characteristics properties of acids and bases

1 describe the characteristic properties of acids as reactions with metals, bases, carbonates and effect on litmus

2 define acids and bases in terms of proton transfer, limited to aqueous solutions

3 describe neutrality, relative acidity and alkalinity in terms of pH (whole numbers only) measured using Universal Indicator paper

4 use these ideas to explain specified reactions as acid/base

5 describe and explain the importance of the use of lime in controlling acidity in soil

6.2 Types of oxides

1 classify oxides as either acidic or basic, related to metallic and non-metallic character of the element forming the oxide

2 classify other oxides as neutral or amphoteric

6.3 Preparation of salts

1 describe the preparation, separation and purification of salts as examples of some of the techniques specified in section 2 and the reactions specified in section 6.1

2 suggest a method of making a given salt from suitable starting materials, given appropriate information, including precipitation

6.4 Identification of ions

1 describe the use of the following tests to identify:

– aqueous cations: ammonium, copper(II), iron(II), iron(III) and zinc, using aqueous sodium hydroxide and aqueous ammonia as appropriate. (Formulae of complex ions are not required.)

– anions: carbonate (by reaction with dilute acid and then limewater), chloride (by reaction under acidic conditions with aqueous silver nitrate), nitrate (by reduction with aluminium to ammonia) and sulfate (by reaction under acidic conditions with aqueous barium ions)

6.5 Identification of gases

1 describe the use of the following tests to identify: ammonia (using damp red litmus paper), carbon dioxide (using limewater), chlorine (using damp litmus paper), hydrogen (using a lighted splint), oxygen (using a glowing splint)

See also Appendix below for sections 6.4 and 6.5

Appendix - Summary of test results for chemical identification

Tests for anions - anion test and results

carbonate (CO3) add dilute acid effervescence, carbon dioxide produced

chloride (Cl–) [in solution] acidify with dilute nitric acid, then add aqueous silver nitrate white ppt.

nitrate (NO3–) [in solution] add aqueous sodium hydroxide, then aluminium foil; warm carefully ammonia produced

sulfate (SO4) [in solution] acidify with dilute nitric acid, then add aqueous barium nitrate white ppt.

Tests for aqueous cations

cation effect of aqueous sodium hydroxide (NaOH(aq)) and effect of aqueous ammonia (NH3(aq))

NaOH(aq) - ammonium (NH4+) ammonia produced on warming

NaOH(aq) - copper(II) (Cu2+) light blue ppt., insoluble in excess

NH3(aq) - copper(II) (Cu2+) light blue ppt., soluble in excess, giving a dark blue solution

NaOH(aq)/NH3(aq) - iron(II) (Fe2+) green ppt., insoluble in excess

NaOH(aq)/NH3(aq) - iron(III) (Fe3+) red-brown ppt., insoluble in excess

NaOH(aq)/NH3(aq) - zinc (Zn2+) white ppt., soluble in excess, giving a colourless solution

Tests for gases

gas test and test result

ammonia (NH3) turns damp red litmus paper blue

carbon dioxide (CO2) turns lime water milky

chlorine (Cl2) bleaches damp litmus paper

hydrogen (H2) ‘pops’ with a lighted splint

oxygen (O2) relights a glowing splint

C7.The Periodic Table

1 describe the Periodic Table as a method of classifying elements and describe its use in predicting properties of elements

7.1 Periodic trends

1 describe the change from metallic to non-metallic character across a Period

2 describe the relationship between group number and the number of outer electrons

7.2 Group properties

1 describe lithium, sodium and potassium in Group I as a collection of relatively soft metals showing a trend in melting point, density and reaction with water

2 predict the properties of other elements in the group given data, where appropriate

3 describe chlorine, bromine and iodine in Group VII as a collection of diatomic non-metals showing a trend in colour, and state their reaction with other halide ions

4 predict the properties of other elements in the group given data, where appropriate

5 identify trends in other groups given data about the elements concerned

7.3 Transition elements

1 describe the transition elements as a collection of metals having high densities, high melting points and forming coloured compounds, and which, as elements and compounds, often act as catalysts

7.4 Noble gases

1 describe the noble gases as being unreactive

2 describe the uses of the noble gases in providing an inert atmosphere (e.g. argon in lamps and helium for filling weather balloons)

C8. Metals

8.1 Properties of metals

1 compare the general physical and chemical properties of metals with those of non-metals

8.2 Reactivity series

1 place in order of reactivity: calcium, copper, (hydrogen), iron, magnesium, potassium, sodium and zinc, by reference to the reactions, if any and where relevant, of the metals with – water or steam, – dilute hydrochloric acid (equations not required) – the aqueous ions of other metals

2 account for the apparent unreactivity of aluminium in terms of the oxide layer adhering to the metal

3 deduce an order of reactivity from a given set of experimental results

8.3 (a) Extraction of metals

1 describe the ease in obtaining metals from their ores by relating the elements to the reactivity series

2 describe the essential reactions in the extraction of iron from haematite

3 name metals that occur ‘native’, including copper and gold

4 name the main ores of aluminium, copper and iron

8.3 (b) Uses of metal

1 describe the idea of changing the properties of iron by the controlled use of additives to form steel alloys

2 name the uses, related to their properties, of copper (electrical wiring and in cooking utensils) and of aluminium (aircraft parts and food containers)

3 name the uses of mild steel (car bodies and machinery) and stainless steel (chemical plant and cutlery)

4 name the uses of zinc for galvanising and making brass

C9. Air and water

1 describe a chemical test for water

2 show understanding that hydration may be reversible (e.g. by heating hydrated copper(II) sulfate or hydrated cobalt(II) chloride)

3 describe, in outline, the purification of the water supply in terms of filtration and chlorination

4 name some of the uses of water in industry and in the home

5 describe the composition of clean air as being approximately 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen and the remainder as being a mixture of noble gases, water vapour and carbon dioxide

6 name the common pollutants in the air as being carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen and lead compounds

7 state the source of each of these pollutants:

– carbon monoxide from the incomplete combustion of carbon-containing substances

– sulfur dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels which contain sulfur compounds (leading to 'acid rain')

– oxides of nitrogen and lead compounds from car exhausts

8 explain the catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides from car exhaust gases

9 state the adverse effect of common pollutants on buildings and on health

10 describe the separation of oxygen and nitrogen from liquid air by fractional distillation

11 name the uses of oxygen in oxygen tents in hospitals, and with acetylene (a hydrocarbon) in welding

12 describe methods of rust prevention:

– paint and other coatings, to exclude oxygen

– galvanising

13 explain galvanising in terms of the reactivity of zinc and iron

14 describe the need for nitrogen-, phosphorous- and potassium-containing fertilisers

15 describe the formation of carbon dioxide:

– as a product of complete combustion of carbon-containing substances

– as a product of respiration

– as a product of the reaction between an acid and a carbonate

C10. Lime and limestone

1 describe the manufacture of calcium oxide (lime) from calcium carbonate (limestone) in terms of the chemical reactions involved

2 name some uses of lime and calcium hydroxide (slaked lime) as in treating acidic soil and neutralising acidic industrial waste products

C11. Organic chemistry

11.1 Names of compounds

1 name, and draw, the structures of methane, ethane, ethanol, ethanoic acid and the products of the reactions stated in sections 11.4 to 11.6

2 state the type of compound present, given a chemical name ending in -ane, -ene, -ol, or -oic acid or a molecular structure

11.2 Fuels

1 name the fuels coal, natural gas and petroleum

2 name methane as the main constituent of natural gas

3 describe petroleum as a mixture of hydrocarbons and its separation into useful fractions by fractional distillation

4 name the uses of the fractions:

– petrol fraction as fuel in cars

– paraffin fraction for oil stoves and aircraft fuel

– diesel fraction for fuel in diesel engines

– lubricating fraction for lubricants and making waxes and polishes

– bitumen for making roads

11.3 Homologous series

1 describe the concept of homologous series as a 'family' of similar compounds with similar properties due to the presence of the same functional group

11.4 Alkanes

1 describe the properties of alkanes (exemplified by methane) as being generally unreactive, except in terms of burning

11.5 Alkenes

1 describe the properties of alkenes in terms of addition reactions with bromine, hydrogen and steam

2 describe the manufacture of alkenes and of hydrogen by cracking

3 distinguish between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons from molecular structures, by simple chemical tests

4 describe the formation of poly(ethene) as an example of addition polymerisation of monomer units

11.6 Alcohols

1 name the uses of ethanol: as a solvent, as a fuel and as a constituent of wine and beer

2 describe the formation of ethanol by fermentation and by the catalytic addition of steam to ethene


PHYSICS 0652 Curriculum Core Content and Supplements

Throughout this section, attention should be paid to showing the relevance of concepts to the student’s everyday life and to the natural and man-made world.

P1. General physics

1.1 Length and time

1 use and describe the use of rules and measuring cylinders to determine a length or a volume

2 use and describe the use of a mechanical method for the measurement of a small distance

3 use and describe the use of clocks and devices for measuring an interval of time

4 measure and describe how to measure a short interval of time (including the period of a pendulum)

1.2 Speed, velocity and acceleration

1 define speed and calculate speed from total time total distance

2 distinguish between speed and velocity

3 plot and interpret a speed / time graph

4 recognise linear motion for which the acceleration is constant and calculate the acceleration

5 recognise from the shape of a speed / time graph when a body is:

– at rest

– moving with constant speed

– moving with changing speed

6 recognise motion for which the acceleration is not constant

7 calculate the area under a speed / time graph to determine the distance travelled for motion with constant acceleration

8 demonstrate some understanding that acceleration is related to changing speed

9 state that the acceleration of free fall for a body near to the Earth is constant

10 describe qualitatively the motion of bodies falling in a uniform gravitational field with and without air resistance (including reference to terminal velocity)

1.3 Mass and weight

1 show familiarity with the idea of the mass of a body

2 demonstrate an understanding that mass is a property which 'resists' change in motion

3 state that weight is a force

4 calculate the weight of a body from its mass

5 demonstrate understanding that weights (and hence masses) may be compared using a balance

6 describe, and use the concept of, weight as the effect of a gravitational field on a mass

1.4 Density

1 describe an experiment to determine the density of a liquid and of a regularly shaped solid, and make the necessary calculation

2 describe the determination of the density of an irregularly shaped solid by the method of displacement

1.5 Forces

1.5 (a) Effects of forces

1 state that a force may produce a change in size and shape of a body

2 take readings from and interpret extension load graphs (Hooke's law, as such, is not required)

3 plot extension-load graphs and describe the associated experimental procedure

4 recognise the significance of the term 'limit of proportionality' for an extension-load graph and use proportionality in simple calculations

5 describe the ways in which a force may change the motion of a body

6 recall and use the relation between force, mass and acceleration (including the direction)

1.5 (b) Turning effect

1 describe the moment of a force as a measure of its turning effect and give everyday examples

2 perform and describe an experiment (involving vertical forces) to verify that there is no net moment on a body in equilibrium

1.5 (c) Centre of mass

1 calculate the moment of a force given the necessary information

2 perform and describe an experiment to determine the position of the centre of mass of a plane lamina

3 describe qualitatively the effect of the position of the centre of mass on the stability of simple objects

1.6 Energy, work and power

1.6 (a) Energy

1 give examples of energy in different forms, its conversion and conservation and apply the principle of energy conservation to simple examples

2 describe energy transfer in terms of work done and make calculations involving F Χ d

3 show some understanding of energy of motion and energy of position (i.e. gravitational and strain)

4 use the terms kinetic and potential energy in context

5 recall and use the expressions:

k.e. = ½ mv2

p.e. = mgh

1.6 (b) Major sources of energy and alternative sources of energy

1 describe processes by which energy is converted from one form to another, including reference to:

– chemical/fuel energy (a regrouping of atoms)

– energy from water (hydroelectric energy, waves, tides)

– geothermal energy

– nuclear energy (fission of heavy atoms)

– solar energy (fusion of nuclei of atoms in the Sun)

recall and use the mass/energy equation E = mc2

2 express a qualitative understanding of efficiency

1.6 (c) Work

1 relate, without calculation, work done to the magnitude of a force and distance moved

2 recall and use the formula ΔW = F Χ d = ΔE

1.6 (d) Power

1 relate, without calculation, power to work done and time taken, using appropriate examples

2 recall and use the equation P = E / t in simple systems

P2. Thermal physics

2.1 Thermal properties

2.1 (a) Thermal expansion of solids, liquids and gases

1 describe qualitatively the thermal expansion of solids, liquids and gases

2 show an appreciation of the relative order of magnitude of the expansion of solids, liquids and gases

3 identify and explain some of the everyday applications and consequences of thermal expansion

2.1 (b) Measurement of temperature

1 appreciate how a physical property which varies with temperature may be used for the measurement of temperature and state examples of such properties

2 apply a given property to the measurement of temperature

3 demonstrate understanding of sensitivity, range and linearity

4 recognise the need for and identify a fixed point

5 describe the structure and action of liquid-in-glass thermometers

6 describe the structure and action of a thermocouple and show understanding of its use for measuring high temperatures and those which vary rapidly

2.1 (c) Melting and boiling

1 describe melting and boiling in terms of energy input without a change in temperature

2 distinguish between boiling and evaporation

3 state the meaning of melting point and boiling point

2.2 Transfer of thermal energy

2.2 (a) Conduction

1 describe experiments to demonstrate the properties of good and bad conductors of heat

2 give a simple molecular account of the heat transfer in solids

2.2 (b) Convection

1 relate convection in fluids to density changes and describe experiments to illustrate convection

2.2 (c) Radiation

1 identify infra-red radiation as part of the electromagnetic spectrum

2 describe experiments to show the properties of good and bad emitters and good and bad absorbers of infra-red radiation

2.2 (d) Consequences of energy transfer

1 identify and explain some of the everyday applications and consequences of conduction, convection and radiation

P3. Properties of waves, including light and sound

3.1 General wave properties

1 describe what is meant by wave motion as illustrated by vibration in ropes, springs and by experiments using water waves

2 use the term wavefront

3 give the meaning of speed, frequency, wavelength and amplitude

4 recall and use the equation c = f λ

5 describe the use of water waves to show

– reflection at a plane surface

– refraction due to a change of speed

6 interpret reflection, refraction and diffraction using wave theory

3.2 Light

3.2 (a) Reflection of light

1 describe the formation, and give the characteristics, of an optical image formed by a plane mirror

2 perform simple constructions, measurements and calculations

3 use the law

angle of incidence = angle of reflection

3.2 (b) Refraction of light

1 describe the refraction, including angle of refraction, in terms of the passage of light through a parallel sided glass block

2 determine and calculate refractive index using n = sin i / sin r

3.2 (c) Thin converging lens

1 describe the action of a thin converging lens on a beam of light

2 use and describe the use of a single lens as a magnifying glass

3 use the term focal length

3.2 (d) Electromagnetic spectrum

1 describe the main features of the electromagnetic spectrum and state that all e.m. waves travel with the same high speed in vacuo

2 state the approximate value of the speed of electromagnetic waves

3 use the term monochromatic

3.3 Sound

1 describe the production of sound by vibrating sources

2 state the approximate range of audible frequencies

3 show an understanding that a medium is required in order to transmit sound waves

P4. Electricity and magnetism

4.1 Simple phenomena of magnetism

1 state the properties of magnets

2 give an account of induced magnetism

3 distinguish between ferrous and non-ferrous materials

4 describe an experiment to identify the pattern of field lines round a bar magnet

5 distinguish between the magnetic properties of iron and steel

6 distinguish between the design and use of permanent magnets and electro-magnets

4.2 Electrostatics

1 describe simple experiments to show the production and detection of electrostatic charges

4.2 (a) Electric charge

1 state that there are positive and negative charges

3 state that unlike charges attract and that like charges repel

2 state that charge is measured in coulombs

4.3 Electricity

1 state that current is related to the flow of charge

2 show understanding that a current is a rate of flow of charge and recall and use the equation I = Q / t

4.3 (a) Current

1 use and describe the use of an ammeter

4.3 (b) Electro-motive force (e.m.f.)

1 state that the e.m.f. of a source of electrical energy is measured in volts

2 show understanding that e.m.f. is defined in terms of energy supplied by a source in driving charge round a complete circuit

4.3 (c) Potential difference (p.d.)

1 state that the potential difference across a circuit component is measured in volts

2 use and describe the use of a voltmeter

4.3 (d) Resistance

1 recall and use the equation V = IR

2 recall and use quantitatively the proportionality between resistance and the length, and the inverse proportionality between resistance and cross-sectional area, of a wire

3 describe an experiment to determine resistance using a voltmeter and an ammeter

4 relate (without calculation) the resistance of a wire to its length and to its diameter

4.3 (e) V/I characteristic graphs

1 sketch the V / I characteristic graphs for metallic (ohmic) conductors

4.4 Electric circuits

1 draw and interpret circuit diagrams containing sources, switches, resistors (fixed and variable), ammeters, voltmeters, magnetising coils, bells, fuses, relays

2 draw and interpret circuit diagrams containing diodes as rectifiers

3 understand that the current at every point in a series circuit is the same

4 recall and use the fact that the sum of the p.d.'s across the components in a series circuit is equal to the total p.d. across the supply

5 give the combined resistance of two or more resistors in series

6 state that, for a parallel circuit, the current from the source is larger than the current in each branch

7 recall and use the fact that the current from the source is the sum of the currents in the separate branches of a parallel circuit

8 state that the combined resistance of two resistors in parallel is less than that of either resistor by itself

9 calculate the effective resistance of two resistors in parallel

4.5 Practical electric circuitry

4.5 (a) Uses of electricity

1 describe the uses of electricity in heating, lighting (including lamps in parallel), motors

2 recall and use the equations P = I x V and E = I x V x t and their alternative forms

4.5 (b) Safety considerations

1 state the hazards of

– damaged insulation

– overheating of cables

– damp conditions

4.6 Electromagnetic effects

4.6 (a) Electromagnetic induction

1 describe an experiment which shows that a changing magnetic field can induce an e.m.f. in a circuit

2 state the factors affecting the magnitude of the induced e.m.f.

3 show understanding that the direction of an induced e.m.f. opposes the change causing it

4.6 (b) a.c. generator

1 describe a rotating-coil generator and the use of slip rings

2 sketch a graph of voltage output against time for a simple a.c. generator

4.6 (c) d.c. motor

1 state that a current-carrying coil in a magnetic field experiences a turning effect and that the effect is increased by increasing the number of turns on the coil

2 describe the effect of increasing the current

3 relate this turning effect to the action of an electric motor

4.6 (d) Transformer

1 describe the construction of a basic iron-cored transformer as used for voltage transformations

2 show an understanding of the principle of operation of a transformer

3 use the equation (Vp / Vs) = (Np / Ns)

4 recall and use the equation Vp Ip = Vs Is (for 100% efficiency)

5 show understanding of energy loss in cables (calculation not required)

6 describe the use of the transformer in high-voltage transmission of electricity

7 advantages of high voltage transmission

4.7 Cathode rays and the cathode-ray oscilloscope (c.r.o.)

4.7 (a) Cathode rays

1 describe the production and detection of cathode rays

2 distinguish between the direction of electron current and conventional current

3 describe their deflection in electric fields and magnetic fields

4 deduce that the particles emitted in thermionic emission are negatively charged

5 state that the particles emitted in thermionic emission are electrons

4.7 (b) Simple treatment of cathode-ray oscilloscope

1 describe in outline the basic structure, and action, of a cathode-ray oscilloscope (detailed circuits are not required)

2 use and describe the use of a c.r.o. to measure p.d.s and short intervals of time (detailed circuits are not required)

3 use and describe the use of a cathode-ray oscilloscope to display waveforms

P5. Atomic physics

5.1 Radioactivity

5.1 (a) Detection of radioactivity

1 show awareness of the existence of background radioactivity

2 describe the detection of alpha-particles, beta-articles and gamma-rays

5.1 (b) Characteristics of the three kinds of emission

1 state that radioactive emissions occur randomly over space and time

2 state, for radioactive emissions: – their nature – their relative ionising effects – their relative penetrating abilities

3 describe their deflection in electric fields and magnetic fields

5.1 (c) Radioactive decay

1 state the meaning of radioactive decay, using word equations to represent changes in the composition of the nucleus when particles are emitted

5.1 (d) Half-life

1 use the term half-life in simple calculations which might involve information in tables or decay curves

5.1 (e) Safety precautions

1 describe how radioactive materials are handled, used and stored in a safe way

5.2 The nuclear atom

5.2 (a) Nucleus

1 describe the composition of the nucleus in terms of protons and neutrons

2 use the term proton number, Z

3 use the term nucleon number, A

4 use the term nuclide and nuclide notation AZX

5 use the nuclide notation in equations to show alpha and beta decay

5.2 (b) Isotopes

1 use the term isotopes

2 give and explain examples of practical applications of isotopes


online help for CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652, revision notes for CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652, what do I need to learn for CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652? revision summary for CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652, help in teaching CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652, learning notes for CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652, help to pass the CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652 exam, how to prepare for the CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652 examination? textbooks for CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652 examination boards CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652 sciences higher education secondary school education college science education institutions level tuition help for CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652 tutors colleges semesters books revision guides college textbooks university education courses university courses medicine biochemistry university medical sciences university chemistry university biology university physics environmental science biomedical physics courses revision books worksheets workbooks practice examination paper questions for CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652 science seminars university entrance examinations exam tuition science teacher training for CIE OCR igcse physical science 0652 study chemistry at Cambridge University study chemistry at  Oxford University study chemistry at Durham University study chemistry at York University study chemistry at Edinburgh University study chemistry at St Andrews University study chemistry at Imperial College London University study chemistry at Warwick University study chemistry at Sussex University study chemistry at Bath University study chemistry at Nottingham University study chemistry at Surrey University study chemistry at Bristol University study chemistry at Cardiff University study chemistry at Birmingham University study chemistry at Manchester University study chemistry at University College London University study chemistry at Strathclyde University study chemistry at Loughborough University study chemistry at Southampton University study chemistry at Sheffield University study chemistry at Glasgow University study chemistry at Liverpool University study chemistry at Leeds University study chemistry at Queens, Belfast University study chemistry at Kings College, London University study chemistry at Heriot-Watt University study chemistry at Lancaster University study chemistry at East Anglia (UEA) University study chemistry at Newcastle University study chemistry at Keele University study chemistry at Leicester  University study chemistry at  Bangor University study chemistry at Nottingham Trent University study chemistry at Kent University study chemistry at Aberdeen University study chemistry at Coventry University study chemistry at Sheffield Hallam University study chemistry at Aston University study chemistry at Hull University study chemistry at Bradford University study chemistry at Huddersfield University study chemistry at Queen Mary, University of London University study chemistry at Reading University study chemistry at Glyndwr University study chemistry at Brighton University study chemistry at Manchester Metropoliten University study chemistry at De Montfort University study chemistry at Northumbria University study chemistry at South Wales University study chemistry at Liverpool John Moores University study chemistry at Central Lancashire University study chemistry at Kingston University study chemistry at West of Scotland University study chemistry at Lincoln University study chemistry at Plymouth University study chemistry at Greenwich University study chemistry at Liverpool Metropolitan  University study physics at Cambridge University study physics at  Oxford University study physics at Durham University study physics at York University study physics at Edinburgh University study physics at St Andrews University study physics at Imperial College London University study physics at Warwick University study physics at Sussex University study physics at Bath University study physics at Nottingham University study physics at Surrey University study physics at Bristol University study physics at Cardiff University study physics at Birmingham University study physics at Manchester University study physics at University College London University study physics at Strathclyde University study physics at Loughborough University study physics at Southampton University study physics at Sheffield University study physics at Glasgow University study physics at Liverpool University study physics at Leeds University study physics at Queens, Belfast University study physics at Kings College, London University study physics at Heriot-Watt University study physics at Lancaster University study physics at East Anglia (UEA) University study physics at Newcastle University study physics at Keele University study physics at Leicester  University study physics at  Bangor University study physics at Nottingham Trent University study physics at Kent University study physics at Aberdeen University study physics at Coventry University study physics at Sheffield Hallam University study physics at Aston University study physics at Hull University study physics at Bradford University study physics at Huddersfield University study physics at Queen Mary, University of London University study physics at Reading University study physics at Glyndwr University study physics at Brighton University study physics at Manchester Metropoliten University study physics at De Montfort University study physics at Northumbria University study physics at South Wales University study physics at Liverpool John Moores University study physics at Central Lancashire University study physics at Kingston University study physics at West of Scotland University study physics at Lincoln University study physics at Plymouth University study physics at Greenwich University study physics at Liverpool Metropolitan  University

 Doc Brown's Chemistry 

*

For latest updates see https://twitter.com/docbrownchem

TOP OF PAGE

visits since January 2000