HOMEPAGE for all of Phil and Molly's Pics

Preserved Locomotives57xx Class Steam Locomotive

Ex GWR and BR No. 7715

Collett Class 5700 0-6-0PT pannier shunting tank engine

Heritage & Preserved Steam Locomotives

5700 Class was the standard GWR shunter

My Archive Steam Photos from the 1960s

GWR Collett design Class 5700 0-6-0 pannier tank engine 7715 was built by Kerr Stuart & Company, California Works, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire in 1930 for shunting duties.

Operated on shunter duties for London Transport and numbered L99

Technical details of steam locomotive 7715

 Class 57xx data: Boiler pressure of 7715: 200 lbf/sq.in.,

 Weight of 7715: 47.5 tons, Wheel diameter of 7715: 4' 7½'',

 Valve gear of 7715: Stephenson slide valves,

Cylinders of 7715 (diameter x stroke): 17½" x 24" (I),

Tractive effort of 7715: 22510 lbf., Power classification of 7715: Class C 4F original restriction for 7715 Blue, Yellow from 1950


GWR tank engine 7715 GWR tank engine 7715, somewhere in the winterish Cotswolds!

GWR tank engine 7715 (photos thanks to James Gallagher)


BUT, see also

BR 3650 Ex GWR Locomotive Collett 5700 0-6-PT pannier tank engine

BR 3738 Ex GWR Locomotive Collett 5700 0-6-PT pannier tank engine

BR 5775 Ex GWR Locomotive Collett 5700 0-6-PT pannier tank engine


*

*


GWR 5700 Class
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Great Western Railway 5700 class.
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer Charles Collett
Builder
GWR Swindon Works (613)
Armstrong Whitworth (25)
W. G. Bagnall (50)
Beyer, Peacock & Co. (25)
Kerr Stuart (25)
North British Locomotive (100)
Yorkshire Engine Co. (25)
Order number See Build details below
Build date 1929–1950
Total produced 863
Specifications
Configuration:

• Whyte 0-6-0PT
• UIC C nt
Gauge 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Driver dia. 4 ft 7 1⁄2 in (1.410 m)
Minimum curve
5 chains (330 ft; 101 m) normal
4 1⁄2 chains (297 ft; 91 m) slow 57xx GWR 5700 Class a steam locomotive 7715
Wheelbase 15 ft 6 in (4.72 m)
Length 31 ft 2 in (9.50 m) over buffers
Width 8 ft 7 in (2.616 m)
Height 12 ft 3 1⁄16 in (3.735 m)
Frame type
Type: Inside
Length: 27 ft 6 in (8.38 m)
Width: 8 ft 7 in (2.616 m)
Axle load 16 long tons 15 cwt (37,500 lb or 17 t)
(18.8 short tons) full 57xx GWR 5700 Class b steam locomotive 7715
Loco weight 47 long tons 10 cwt (106,400 lb or 48.3 t)
(53.2 short tons) full 57xx GWR 5700 Class c steam locomotive 7715
Fuel type Coal
Fuel capacity 3 long tons 6 cwt (7,400 lb or 3.4 t)
(3.7 short tons) 57xx GWR 5700 Class d steam locomotive 7715
Water cap 1,200 imp gal (5,500 l; 1,400 US gal) 57xx GWR 5700 Class e steam locomotive 7715
Firebox:
• Firegrate area 15.3 sq ft (1.42 m2)
Boiler
Barrel: 10 ft 3 in (3.12 m)
Outside diameter: 4 ft 5 in (1.35 m) & 4 ft 3 7⁄8 in (1.318 m)
Pitch: 6 ft 11 3⁄4 in (2.127 m)
Boiler pressure 200 lbf/in2 (1.38 MPa)
Heating surface 1,178.0 sq ft (109.44 m2)
• Tubes 1,075.7 sq ft (99.94 m2)
• Firebox 102.3 sq ft (9.50 m2)
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size 17.5 in × 24 in (444 mm × 610 mm)
Valve gear Stephenson
Valve type Slide valves
Train heating steam 57xx GWR 5700 Class f steam locomotive 7715
Loco brake steam
Train brakes vacuum 57xx GWR 5700 Class f steam locomotive 7715
Safety systems ATC 57xx GWR 5700 Class f steam locomotive 7715
Performance figures
Tractive effort 22,515 lbf (100.15 kN)
Career
Operators GWR » BR
Power class
GWR: C
BR: 3F
Numbers See Numbering below
Axle load class GWR: Blue until 1950, then Yellow
Withdrawn 1956–1966
Preserved 16
6700-49 – 4 chains (264 ft; 80 m) (normal) and 3 1⁄2 chains (231 ft; 70 m) (slow).
8750 class – 17 long tons 0 cwt (38,100 lb or 17.3 t)
(19.0 short tons), 9700 class – 17 long tons 4 cwt (38,500 lb or 17.5 t)
(19.3 short tons).
8750 class – 49 long tons 0 cwt (109,800 lb or 49.8 t)
(54.9 short tons), and 9700 class – 50 long tons 15 cwt (113,700 lb or 51.6 t)
(56.8 short tons).
9700 class – 2 long tons 16 cwt (6,300 lb or 2.8 t)
(3.1 short tons).
9700 class – 1,230 imp gal (5,600 l; 1,480 US gal).
6700-79 were built for shunting only and were not fitted with ATC, vacuum braking, and steam heating.
The Great Western Railway (GWR) 5700 Class, or 57xx class, is a class of 0-6-0 pannier tank steam locomotive, built between 1929 and 1950. 863 were built, making them the most prolific class of the GWR, and one of the most numerous classes of British steam locomotive. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class a steam locomotive 7715

Although officially designated by GWR as "light goods and shunting engines", 57xx GWR 5700 Class 2 steam locomotive 7715 they were also used for passenger working on branch, suburban, and shorter mainline journeys.

They were distributed across most of the GWR network and, after nationalisation of the railways in 1948, across the British Railways Western Region, and also other regions.

The 5700s were not as glamorous as the GWR Castles and Kings, but became just as much of an icon of the GWR. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 3 steam locomotive 7715

As a result of the 1955 Modernisation Plan, the 5700 Class was withdrawn from BR service between 1956 and 1966. Nineteen withdrawn locomotives were sold to London Transport and industry, of which ten were later preserved, along with six that were retrieved from scrapyards.

Background
The GWR started designing and building 0-6-0 tank locomotives in 1860, 57xx GWR 5700 Class 4 steam locomotive 7715 and this continued into the BR era until 1956, with a total of 2,393 being built. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 5 steam locomotive 7715 The GWR also used 0-6-0 tank locomotives from other manufacturers' designs (from its subsidiary and absorbed railways' stock 57xx GWR 5700 Class 6 steam locomotive 7715 ), and since 1898 it always had at least 1,000 tank locomotives in stock. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 5 steam locomotive 7715

The early 0-6-0 tank engines were fitted with either saddle tanks (wrapped over the boiler) or side tanks (mounted at the side of the boiler and reaching down to the running platform). GWR first fitted pannier tanks (mounted on the side of the boiler but not reaching down to the running platform) in 1898 to nine 4-4-0 tank locomotives and, in 1901, to five 0-6-0T locomotives which were also fitted with Belpaire fireboxes. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 7 steam locomotive 7715 The shape of the Belpaire firebox gives a larger surface area which improves heat transfer and steam production, 57xx GWR 5700 Class 8 steam locomotive 7715 but their rectangular shape made them difficult to combine with saddle tanks. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 9 steam locomotive 7715 Locomotives fitted with pannier tanks have a lower centre of gravity than those with saddle tanks (enabling higher speeds on curves), 57xx GWR 5700 Class 9 steam locomotive 7715 and access for maintenance is easier than for those fitted with side tanks. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 10 steam locomotive 7715

Churchward's period as Chief Mechanical Engineer (1901–21) is well known for significant improvements in locomotive design and manufacture, 57xx GWR 5700 Class 11 steam locomotive 7715 and the development of standard designs. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 12 steam locomotive 7715 However, the scope of the standard designs did not include the 0-6-0 tank locomotive, 57xx GWR 5700 Class 13 steam locomotive 7715 and the GWR did not introduce any new 0-6-0 tank designs from 1897 to 1928 (with exception of the GWR 1361 class of five 0-6-0 saddle tanks in 1910). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 14 steam locomotive 7715

However, pannier tanks and Belpaire fireboxes became the standard for the rebuilding of various 0-6-0 tank locomotives (projected in 1902 and getting fully underway by 1910). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 5 steam locomotive 7715 The rebuilding program also included a number of other changes including:

improved cab designs, eventually becoming fully enclosed 57xx GWR 5700 Class 15 steam locomotive 7715
superheating, which by 1929, had been found to have little benefit on shunting engines 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715
adaptation for working with autocoaches for push–pull trains (auto-working) 57xx GWR 5700 Class 5 steam locomotive 7715
increasing boiler pressures, for example, the various rebuilds of the GWR 2721 class started at 150 lbf/in2 (1.03 MPa), increasing to 165 lbf/in2 (1.14 MPa), and then to 180 lbf/in2 (1.24 MPa) 57xx GWR 5700 Class 16 steam locomotive 7715
With the completion of grouping in 1923, GWR's collection of 0-6-0 tank locomotives was expanded with the stock from 28 acquired companies. The acquired tank locomotives came from different manufacturers, were a mixture of side, saddle and pannier, and varied widely by size and state of repair. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 17 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class 18 steam locomotive 7715 In addition, GWR's stock was wearing out, 57xx GWR 5700 Class 13 steam locomotive 7715 and the variety of classes was problematic for maintenance and rostering. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 19 steam locomotive 7715 Collett had to produce a new standard design for 0-6-0 pannier tanks. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 2 steam locomotive 7715 The result was the 5700 class.

Design
The first batch of 300 locomotives built between 1929 and 1931 included a medium height chimney, a mid-boiler dome, safety valve with cover, and an enclosed cab. The boiler included a top-feed (between the chimney and dome). They were similar in appearance to older 0-6-0 tank engines that had been rebuilt as pannier tanks, particularly the later rebuilds of the 2721 class. The 2721 class was itself a development of the 1854 class, which in turn was based on the 645 class. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715

Specification
The table below gives the technical specifications of the 5700 class. Values are from GWR diagram B48 57xx GWR 5700 Class 20 steam locomotive 7715 unless referenced otherwise.

5700s technical specifications
Dimensions
Length over buffers: 31 ft 2 in (9.50 m) Width: 8 ft 7 in (2.62 m) Height: 12 ft 3 1⁄16 in (3.74 m)
Firegrate area 15.3 sq ft (1.42 m2)
Firebox
Outside: 5 ft 4 in (1.63 m) x 4 ft 7 3⁄8 in (1.41 m) and 4 ft 0 in (1.22 m)
Inside: 4 ft 7 3⁄16 in (1.40 m) x 3 ft 8 in (1.12 m) and 3 ft 3 3⁄4 in (1.01 m)
Height: 6 ft 0 1⁄2 in (1.84 m)
Tubes
2 off diameter 5 1⁄8 in (0.13 m) 233 off diameter 1 5⁄8 in (0.04 m) Length: 10 ft 6 13⁄16 in (3.22 m)
Heating surface
Tubes: 1,075.7 sq ft (99.94 m2)
Firebox: 102.3 sq ft (9.50 m2)
Total: 1,178.0 sq ft (109.44 m2)
Boiler
Barrel: 10 ft 3 in (3.12 m) Outside diameter: 4 ft 5 in (1.35 m) & 4 ft 3 7⁄8 in (1.318 m) Pitch: 6 ft 11 3⁄4 in (2.127 m)
Working pressure 200 lbf/in2 (1.38 MPa)
Cylinders
Two Inside Diameter: 17 1⁄2 in (0.44 m) Stroke: 24 in (0.61 m)
Valve gear Stephenson (slide) 57xx GWR 5700 Class 21 steam locomotive 7715
Wheels 4 ft 7 1⁄2 in (1.410 m) diameter, coupled
Wheelbase 15 ft 6 in (7 ft 3 in + 8 ft 3 in) (4.72 m (2.21 m + 2.51 m))
Tractive effort (85%) 22,515 lbf (100.15 kN)
Coal capacity 3 long tons 6 cwt (7,400 lb or 3.4 t) 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715
Water capacity 1,200 imp gal (5,500 l; 1,400 US gal)
Weight (full)
First axle: 16 long tons 15 cwt (37,500 lb or 17 t)
Second axle: 16 long tons 15 cwt (37,500 lb or 17 t)
Third axle: 14 long tons 0 cwt (31,400 lb or 14.2 t)
Total: 47 long tons 10 cwt (106,400 lb or 48.3 t)
Minimum curve
Normal: 5 chains (330 ft; 100 m) Slow: 4 1⁄2 chains (300 ft; 91 m) 57xx GWR 5700 Class 22 steam locomotive 7715
The 5700s were given the GWR route colour Blue 57xx GWR 5700 Class b steam locomotive 7715 (based on axle load), and were in the GWR power group C (based on tractive effort). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 24 steam locomotive 7715 The classifications were shown on the cab with the letter C in a blue disc.

le Fleming describes the 5700 class as "an almost unaltered continuation of the 27xx rebuilds" 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 and Holcroft describes them as "practically identical to 2721 rebuilds", 57xx GWR 5700 Class 25 steam locomotive 7715 but according to Nock it was "a thoroughly modern design", 57xx GWR 5700 Class 26 steam locomotive 7715 and Jones notes that design included "numerous detailed improvements" and reflected improved construction techniques. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 27 steam locomotive 7715 The main differences from the 2721 class include:

increased boiler pressure, 57xx GWR 5700 Class 28 steam locomotive 7715 from 180 lbf/in2 (1.24 MPa) 57xx GWR 5700 Class 29 steam locomotive 7715 to 200 lbf/in2 (1.38 MPa), 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 giving a corresponding increase in tractive effort
improved valve settings 57xx GWR 5700 Class 28 steam locomotive 7715
longer frame, from 26 ft 9 in (8.15 m) 57xx GWR 5700 Class 30 steam locomotive 7715 to 27 ft 6 in (8.38 m) 57xx GWR 5700 Class 20 steam locomotive 7715
fully enclosed cab 57xx GWR 5700 Class 28 steam locomotive 7715
The initial design also included a return to non-fluted coupling rods and laminated springs beneath the leading and driving axleboxes (both features harking back to the 1854 class). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 The locomotives were also fitted with cast iron chimneys (which had only rarely been fitted to earlier locomotives), 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 and the whistles were fitted on top of the firebox rather than on top of the cab.

6700 Sub-class
Of the first batch of 300 locomotives, most were fitted with vacuum brakes and steam heating, and some of these were also fitted with GWR's Automatic Train Control (ATC) safety system. 57xx GWR 5700 Class c steam locomotive 7715

However, the 50 locomotives of the 6700 Class, or 67xx class, were not fitted with vacuum brakes, steam heating, or ATC, and were fitted with three link couplings only; they were therefore limited to shunting duties and some freight working. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 31 steam locomotive 7715 The 6700s had a smaller minimum curve radius of 4 chains (260 ft; 80 m) (normal) and 3 1⁄2 chains (230 ft; 70 m) (slow) and an increased axle clearance.

8750 Sub-class
The 8750 Class, or 87xx class, were first built in 1933, using an updated design which included an improved cab with a higher roof, rectangular windows and grills (as opposed to the round windows, or "spectacles", of the initial design), and sliding shutters and hinged doors for more protection from the elements. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715 The new style cab was derived from the sister 5400 class, the first of which were built in 1931. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 31 steam locomotive 7715 Vacuum brakes, steam heating, and ATC were fitted as standard (except for Nos. 6750–79, built between 1946 and 1950, which were fitted with steam brakes and three link couplings only). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715 The locomotive weight increased to 49 long tons 0 cwt (109,800 lb or 49.8 t), and the axle load increased to 17 long tons 0 cwt (38,100 lb or 17.3 t). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715

9700 Class
A pannier tank locomotive adapted for underground working. The pannier tank shown is shorter than usual, starting behind the smokebox and after about a third of its length extends down to the footplate. At the front there is a pump and extra pipe work, which also extends above the boiler.
No. 9701 at Paddington, showing the modified tanks and condensing apparatus
The 9700 Class, or 97xx class, pannier tanks were a direct development of the 5700 class. The prototype for the class, No. 8700 (later No. 9700), was a rebuilt 5700 locomotive. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 They were specifically for working on the Metropolitan/Hammersmith & City lines between Paddington Stations and Smithfield Meat Market. They replaced Metro and 633 class locomotives.

The eleven locomotives in the class had condensing apparatus that fed the exhaust steam back into the water tanks. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 32 steam locomotive 7715 The tanks themselves were shortened to make room for the external exhaust pipes and were extended down to the footplate in front of the cab to increase their capacity. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 32 steam locomotive 7715 As condensing the steam heated the water, a reciprocating pump (Weir pump) was fitted as a boiler feedwater pump because standard injectors will not work with hot water. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 32 steam locomotive 7715 The pumps led to (unsuccessful) tests with these locomotives acting as fire engines during World War II.

To work over the electrified underground lines, the 9700 Class locomotives had a special type of ATC equipment that lifted clear of the centre rail and had tripcock brake valves that matched the London Transport signalling system. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class 32 steam locomotive 7715 The design changes resulted in reduced coal (2 long tons 16 cwt (6,300 lb or 2.8 t)) and water (1,230 imp gal (5,600 l; 1,480 US gal)) capacities. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715 The locomotive weight increased to 50 long tons 15 cwt (113,700 lb or 51.6 t), and the axle load increased to 17 long tons 4 cwt (38,500 lb or 17.5 t). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715

Later developments
From 1936 to 1942 a number of small changes were introduced to new builds:

in 1936 a whistle shield was added to the front of the cab to deflect steam away from the cab windows. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715
also in 1936 pocket steps and extra railings were added to the fireman's side (left side) of the cab to improve access to the bunker. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715
in 1937 a drawing was issued for fitting shutters and doors to the older, pre-8750 class, locomotives. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715
in 1938 a larger whistle shield was fitted, which became standard for the larger cabs. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715
in 1942 a new type of top feed was introduced, with separate clackboxes in a taller cover, and internal delivery pipes rather than trays. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715
All these changes (with the exception of the new top feed) were later applied to locomotives that had been built earlier. The new top feed became standard for new locomotives in 1944. Some older boilers and locomotives were later fitted with the new top feed, and some locomotives that were built with the new top feed were later changed back to the old design as boilers were swapped. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715

Variants
A small number of 5700s were adapted for specific tasks:

in 1937, 1938 and during World War II thirteen 5700s were fitted with spark arresting chimneys for work on industrial and military sites with significant fire risks. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class 32 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class d steam locomotive 7715
in 1958 No. 3711 was converted to oil burning by Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 33 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class e steam locomotive 7715
in 1946 No. 7722 was fitted with winding gear to work the Pwllyrhebog Colliery incline on the former Taff Vale Railway. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class 33 steam locomotive 7715
Production
The first 5700s were built in 1929 by North British Locomotive Co. and, later in the year, at GWR's Swindon Works. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 22 steam locomotive 7715 Between 1929 and 1931 a total of 300 were built, of which 50 were built by GWR, and the rest by outside contractors:

Armstrong Whitworth: 25 (Nos. 7775–99)
W. G. Bagnall: 50 (Nos. 6700–24, 8725–49) 57xx GWR 5700 Class f steam locomotive 7715
Beyer, Peacock & Co: 25 (Nos. 8700–24)
Kerr Stuart: 25 (Nos. 7700–24)
North British: 100 (Nos. 5700–49, 7725–74)
Yorkshire Engine Co: 25 (Nos. 6725–49)
It was unusual, but not unprecedented, for GWR to use outside contractors to build locomotives (50 of the 200 strong 5600 class had been built by Armstrong Whitworth). 57xx GWR 5700 Class g steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class 18 steam locomotive 7715 The building programme was partly funded by interest-free Government loans intended to relieve unemployment during the Great Depression. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 Also, stricter accountancy rules that distinguished between maintenance and building costs meant that it was often economically worthwhile to build new locomotives rather than repair older locomotives. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 36 steam locomotive 7715

At first, more 5700s were built than were immediately needed so Nos. 6700–49 were stored for a couple of years before being allocated. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 Many of these were then assigned to sheds near the South Wales ports of Newport, Barry, Cardiff and Swansea. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 37 steam locomotive 7715

After a gap of a year, building started again in 1933, with the 8750 and 9700 classes, and continued until 1950. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 38 steam locomotive 7715 All the later locomotives, totalling 563, were built at Swindon, and the numbers built only dropped in the last few years with the introduction of the 9400 class in 1947.

Numbering and liveries
The size of the class demanded that the 5700 class locomotives were spread across several series of numbers. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 31 steam locomotive 7715

The different series started in the following chronological order; 57xx (1929), 77xx (1929), 67xx (1930), 87xx (1931), 97xx (1933), 37xx (1936), 36xx (1938), 46xx (1941), and 96xx (1945). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 53 steam locomotive 7715 GWR locomotives were not renumbered after nationalisation, but a W (for Western Region) was temporarily added to some locomotives.

The first 5700s built were painted in the standard GWR livery of the time; mainly green above the running plate with the words "GREAT WESTERN" painted in yellow letters with red and black shadowing on the side of the pannier tanks, buffer beams painted red with the number shown in yellow letters with black shadowing, and the front of the smokebox and chimney were black. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 54 steam locomotive 7715 From 1934 the GWR "shirtbutton" roundel replaced "GREAT WESTERN". 57xx GWR 5700 Class 55 steam locomotive 7715 From 1942 GWR replaced the roundel with the letters "G W R", in yellow letters with red and black shading. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 56 steam locomotive 7715 Due to wartime shortages most locomotives, apart from the Kings and Castles, were painted black from 1942 to 1945. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 57 steam locomotive 7715

After nationalisation, some 5700s were painted in BR green with the words "BRITISH RAILWAYS" on the side of the pannier tanks, 57xx GWR 5700 Class 58 steam locomotive 7715 but unlined black soon became the standard for tank locomotives, with the BR crest on the sides of the pannier tanks. Some 5700s also had white and red lining on the pannier tanks and cab sides. The BR crest was changed in 1957. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 59 steam locomotive 7715

The 5700s bought by London Transport between 1956 and 1963 were repainted in the standard LT maroon livery with yellow and black lining. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 60 steam locomotive 7715 Those bought by NCB were painted in a light green. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 49 steam locomotive 7715

Operation
The 5700s were used on GWR for various duties including shunting, pilot work, and light to medium goods. They were also used on branch, commuter and shorter mainline passenger trains. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 61 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class 3 steam locomotive 7715 They were also used on standby for more powerful locomotives, sometimes producing "firework displays" as they strived to keep to the schedule with heavier loads. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715

The 5700s were never fitted remote control gear for working autotrains. This was left to smaller pannier locomotives that followed; the 5400 class (introduced in 1930) and the 6400 Class (introduced in 1932). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 62 steam locomotive 7715

The 9700s (fitted with condensing equipment for underground working) and built specifically for working the line between Paddington and Smithfield, were allocated to Old Oak Common. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 24 steam locomotive 7715

The 6700s (built for shunting only and kept in storage for a couple of years because of a lack of suitable work) eventually found their niche working the marshalling yards between the South Wales coalfields and the coal exporting docks of Llanelli, Swansea, Cardiff, Barry and Newport. Some were allocated to just one shed for their entire working life (Nos. 6700–9 at Cardiff East Dock and Nos. 6725–32 at Newport, Pill). A number of 6700s were also allocated to Swindon, with 6733–41 spending a long time there. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 24 steam locomotive 7715

Thirteen 5700s were fitted with spark arresting chimneys for working in industrial and military systems and sidings, particularly the WD ammunition dump at Milton, near Didcot during World War II. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 63 steam locomotive 7715

The Pwllyrhebog Colliery incline on the former Taff Vale Railway 57xx GWR 5700 Class 1 steam locomotive 7715 was a 3⁄4 mile (1.2 km) 1-in-13 incline with a continuous rope cable so that a descending train was partially counterbalanced by an ascending train. The locomotives (Taff Vale Railway H class) on the incline were fitted with coned boilers so that there was always sufficient water above the firebox. To provide additional control and power a stationary locomotive, fitted with two intergeared drums, controlled the cable. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 33 steam locomotive 7715 No. 2750 Class 2721 had been fitted with the necessary winding gear to control the incline in 1935, 57xx GWR 5700 Class 29 steam locomotive 7715 but was withdrawn in 1945, 57xx GWR 5700 Class 64 steam locomotive 7715 and replaced by 5700 No. 7722 which was fitted with the winding gear in 1946. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715 Operation of the incline ended in 1952. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 33 steam locomotive 7715

Allocation
The 5700s' route classification (Blue) meant that they were allowed on approximately 70% of the GWR network. By 1938 only 15 57xx GWR 5700 Class h steam locomotive 7715 (out of approximately 70) running sheds did not have any 5700s allocated.

In 1950, the route classification was changed to Yellow because of the 5700s' low hammer blow. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715 The change did not apply to Nos. 9700–10. This meant that 5700s were now allowed on almost 90% of the old GWR network (roughly equivalent to the new Western Region of British Rail). By 1954 only five running sheds (Abercynon, Aberystwyth, Machynlleth, Treherbert and Truro) did not have any 5700s allocated. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 23 steam locomotive 7715

BR working
In the early years of British Railways the boundaries between the Western Region and the Southern Region changed a number of times. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 65 steam locomotive 7715 5700s took up new duties in a variety of places:

At Weymouth, 5700s operated the branch line to the Isle of Portland (replacing LSWR O2 class 0-4-4T locomotives). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 65 steam locomotive 7715 They were also seen pulling boat trains through the streets of Weymouth.
Six 5700s were allocated to Nine Elms and worked empty stock between Waterloo and Clapham Junction (replacing LSWR M7 class 0-4-4T locomotives). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 65 steam locomotive 7715
The short Folkestone Harbour branch line from Folkestone Harbour station to Folkestone Junction was always problematic when hauling heavy boat trains up the 1-in-36 incline. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 66 steam locomotive 7715 Six 5700s were allocated to Dover for working (including banking) on the branch (replacing SER R1 class 0-6-0T locomotives). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 67 steam locomotive 7715
The last scheduled passenger trains hauled by 5700s on BR were on seen London Midland Region on the Wrexham to New Brighton route (passing over old LNER territory). The Wrexham to Seacombe service ended at the beginning of 1960 but was immediately replaced by a Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) service between Wrexham and New Brighton. The service on Bank Holidays was so popular that demand outstripped available DMUs, and a relief train of four coaches pulled by No. 3749 was laid on. Two more 5700s were used over the Spring Bank Holiday that year, but from then BR Standard Class 4 2-6-4T locomotives usually handled the relief services. In 1965 5700s were used for the last time on Whit Monday and August Bank Holiday relief services. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 68 steam locomotive 7715

The 5700s were the last steam locomotives used on GWR/Western region. The last working locomotives were allocated to Croes Newydd, and were working goods trains and shunting until November 1966. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 69 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class i steam locomotive 7715 By the end of the steam era the record keeping of allocations and working of local steam locomotives was rather lax, and it was not unknown for locomotives to be used after being officially withdrawn. For many years Nos. 4646, 4696, and 9774 were thought to be the last ex-GWR locomotives to work on British Rail, but No. 9641 was also still in steam at Croes Newydd at the same time. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 71 steam locomotive 7715

Use after British Railways
Nineteen 5700s were sold for further use after being withdrawn by British Railways. The National Coal Board bought five, one was bought by P.D. Fuels, and thirteen were bought by London Transport. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 82 steam locomotive 7715

One more locomotive, No. 9642, was withdrawn in 1964 and sold for scrap to Hayes Scrapyard. It was used for three years to shunt other locomotives being scrapped, and was later saved for preservation. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 83 steam locomotive 7715

London Transport
A pannier tank locomotive is pushing a shunter's wagon and pulling a guard's van. The locomotive is painted in a faded maroon with black and yellow piping, but much of the paint has peeled, revealing the black paint underneath. The lettering "LONDON TRANSPORT" is shown in yellow on the side of the pannier tank.
LT No. L9299, 50 years old, shunts at Croxley Tip in autumn 1969
Although the London underground network had been electrified for many years (the then Metropolitan railway was electrified in 1905) a small number of steam locomotives were retained for engineering and ballast trains. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 84 steam locomotive 7715 By the 1950s the locomotives were past their prime and expensive to maintain, and the planned quadrupling of part of the Metropolitan Main Line would require reliable locomotives. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 85 steam locomotive 7715 London transport considered replacing the steam fleet with diesel shunters, and had also tested (unsuccessfully) a Great Northern Railway Class J52 locomotive in 1955. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 86 steam locomotive 7715

The first 5700 locomotive, No. 7711, underwent trials from January to April 1956, first running between Finchley Road and Baker Street. Modifications were needed to the cab for clearance and the tripcock brake valves after problems were found when running in reverse. Curtains were also fitted to the cab to reduce smoke and fumes in tunnels. In May, the 5700s became the standard for engineering trains on London Transport when they bought No. 7711 (for £3,160), decided to buy another (No. 5752), and planned to buy more over the coming years. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 87 steam locomotive 7715

Thirteen 5700s were bought by London Transport (from 1956 to 1963). 57xx GWR 5700 Class 82 steam locomotive 7715 They were numbered L89 to L99 and were allocated to the depots at Lillie Bridge (Fulham) and Neasden. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 88 steam locomotive 7715 Only eleven were running at any one time, the original L90 and L91 were withdrawn for repairs but scrapped instead and replaced by other locomotives which carried the same number. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 89 steam locomotive 7715

They worked permanent way trains and were never used on normal passenger services. Main line running included trips between depots, to Acton Works and runs out to Croxley Tip, near Watford. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 90 steam locomotive 7715

Three of the LT 5700s lasted until the end of steam on London Transport in 1971 and were the last steam locomotives used for regular mainline working in the UK. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 91 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class k steam locomotive 7715 London Transport commemorated the end of operating steam locomotives with a special run from Moorgate station to Neasden depot. The train comprised No. L94 (No. 7752) and a selection of maintenance rolling stock. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 92 steam locomotive 7715 Three diesel-hydraulic locomotives were bought to carry out the shunting duties from then on. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 89 steam locomotive 7715

National Coal Board
A pannier tank locomotive, seen from above and to the front, is passing through hilly countryside. The locomotive, particularly at the front, is streaked with vertical stains. The lettering "NCB 7754" is shown on the side of the pannier tank.
No. 7754 working for the NCB in 1965
Between 1959 and 1965 the National Coal Board (NCB) bought five 5700s from BR for use at pits in South Wales, continuing a tradition of the GWR selling withdrawn pannier tank locomotives to the NCB. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 82 steam locomotive 7715 The engines retained their BR numbers. The NCB locomotives did not receive maintenance to match GWR standards and were run into the ground, saving the cost of expensive overhauls. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 67 steam locomotive 7715

One of the NCB 5700s, No. 7754, was the last in industrial service, and after working at various collieries was moved to Deep Duffryn Colliery at Mountain Ash in 1970, where an ex-GWR fitter kept it working until 1975 when a loose piston resulted in a blown cylinder cover. No. 7754 could still be seen on shed in 1980. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 97 steam locomotive 7715 The NCB donated No. 7754 to the National Museum Wales, who placed it on permanent loan to the Llangollen Railway. It is now owned by the Llangollen Railway Trust. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 97 steam locomotive 7715

Other uses
A pannier tank locomotive stands alone in a scrapyard next to a semi-derelict building. In the background are other locomotives waiting to be scrapped. To the left is a fence of concrete posts with wire.
No. 9642 at Hayes scrapyard in 1965
No. 3650 was withdrawn in 1963 and then sold to P.D. Fuels, a division of Stephenson Clarke Ltd., and was used to move spoil to slag heaps at Gwaen-Caer-Gurwen colliery near Ammanford, Carmarthenshire. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 78 steam locomotive 7715 It was later bought and restored by members of the Great Western Society and became operational in 2009.

No. 9642 was withdrawn in 1964 and sent to Hayes Scrapyard, near Bridgend. Rather than being scrapped, it was used to shunt other locomotives being scrapped. It was due to be scrapped in 1967, but a last minute intervention resulted in its being bought (1968) and restored by the South Wales Pannier Group, becoming the first of the class to be preserved. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 99 steam locomotive 7715

Preservation
Sixteen 5700 class locomotives have been preserved, of which six are currently operational. Four of the class have worked mainline trains: 7715, 7752, 7760 and 9600. Of these 7752 and 9600 both are operational and capable of working excursion trains on Network Rail but 7715 and 7760 are currently out of service awaiting overhauls. Two locomotives are on static display, and two are in store. Six locomotives are undergoing, or waiting for, maintenance. One locomotive, No. 9629, is being restored, and has not been in steam since it was sent to Barry Scrapyard in 1965.

A number of those bought from London Transport, which had been maintained by British Railways, were still in running order and were used on heritage railways with minimal work. No. 5764 (LT L95) was steamed the day it arrived at Bridgnorth on the Severn Valley Railway, being lit-up before it had been removed from the low-loader on which it was delivered. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 46 steam locomotive 7715 As of June 2018, Nos. 7752 (LT L94) and 5786 (LT L92) can be seen running in the maroon livery of London Transport, but No. 7715 (LT L99) is currently out of service. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 100 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class 101 steam locomotive 7715 57xx GWR 5700 Class 102 steam locomotive 7715

The locomotives that were preserved after NCB and industrial use required rather more work than those acquired from London Transport. Some had been laid up for sometime after being withdrawn, and had received very little, if any, maintenance. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 103 steam locomotive 7715

Of the twelve 5700s that went to Barry Scrapyard, five were saved for preservation and one (No. 3612) was bought for spares by the Severn Valley Railway. 57xx GWR 5700 Class 104 steam locomotive 7715


7715/L99 (5700) A pannier tank locomotive is standing at a platform, leading a train which includes a second locomotive and one visible passenger carriage. The pannier tanker is maroon, apart from the black chimney and red coupling rods and buffer beam. The tank, cab, steps, splashers and toolbox are all lined in yellow. London Transport is written on the side of the tank, and L.99 on the side of the cab, again in yellow. The second, larger, locomotive is green with a brass safety valve cover, a name plate over one of the wheels, and has a tender behind it. No. 7715 was sold to LT in 1959 and renumbered L99. It was bought by the London Railway Preservation Society in 1968 and was later certified for mainline operation on British Rail. No. 7715 has worked specials on LT and has been loaned to other heritage railways and operators, but was withdrawn from service because of a cracked boiler foundation ring. It returned to Quainton[s] in May 2014 and is awaiting the necessary repairs to return it to service. 1930 Kerr Stuart Buckinghamshire Railway Centre



Preserved LocomotivesHOMEPAGE for all of Phil and Molly's PicsMy Archive Steam Photos from the 1960s

Great Railway Journeys Rail Discovery Trips Railway Holidays to France, Italy and Spain from GWR steam locomotive 7715 Booking tickets for Great Railway Journey luxury Rail Trip holidays Train travel in Europe Rail holidays from GWR steam locomotive 7715 to the USA & Canada luxury train through the Rocky Mountain Canadian rail railway holidays through the Rockies US Cities by train from GWR steam locomotive 7715  Continental rail holidays to France Germany Italy Austria Switzerland Glacier Express Great Railway Journeys Rail Discovery Trips Holidays from GWR steam locomotive 7715 from Eurostar to Paris Brussels Avignon Turin Turino Rome Roma

Florence Firenze TGV fast trains Railway travel holidays special steam excursions from GWR steam locomotive 7715 great steam heritage line and offers luxury Pullman coach dining trains GWR steam locomotive 7715 Travelling by train always seems a pleasure, especially if through wonderful scenery  to GWR steam locomotive 7715 in England, Scotland, Wales or on holiday in the rest of Europe! The railway trip from GWR steam locomotive 7715 involves seeing or travelling behind a 'real' steam locomotive in action and there is nothing like the sight and sounds of a steam train to invoke feelings of nostalgia in some of us to GWR steam locomotive 7715 even more luxury by having a special trip out on a steam dining train! England Scotland Wales Northern Ireland top class hotels in GWR steam locomotive 7715 dining out travel tours top tourist destinations tourist information on GWR steam locomotive 7715 weekend breaks mini-breaks family holidays restaurants touring coach trips from GWR steam locomotive 7715 continental tours cruise ships pleasure cruises summer breaks spring breaks continental winter breaks European winter holidays spring holidays summer holidays European Rail tours Railway travel holidays special steam excursions from GWR steam locomotive 7715 A great steam heritage line and offers luxury Pullman coach dining trains European Rail tours US and Canadian Railway travel holidays special steam excursions to GWR steam locomotive 7715 A great steam heritage line and offers luxury Pullman coach dining trains Travelling by train from GWR steam locomotive 7715 always seems a pleasure, especially if through wonderful scenery either in England, Scotland, Wales or on holiday in the rest of the railways of Europe! The railway trip involves seeing or travelling behind a 'real' steam locomotive or heritage diesel in action on a special trip from GWR steam locomotive 7715 Booking Eurostar Continental Rail Travel Tour Tickets Stuttgart Brussels Eurostar Brussels from GWR steam locomotive 7715 by TGV to Ebbsfleet International, Ashford International Stratford International, St Pancras International Paris Gare du Nord Paris Gare de Lyon Paris Gare de L'est Paris Gare Montparnasse by Eurostar from GWR steam locomotive 7715 London to Paris, Eurostar London - Brussels Eurostar London to Lille deals bargain city breaks Great Railway Journey holidays in Italy, Spain and France by TGV booking from GWR steam locomotive 7715

Good trainspotting 'TRAINSPOTS' Good trainspotting and photographic locations  Barnetby Station, North Lincolnshire  *  Carlisle Station  *  Clapham Junction Station, London  *  Colton Junction, south of York  *  Crewe Station  *  Doncaster Station, South Yorkshire  * Hellifield station - Carlisle to Settle line * Lancaster station  * Newcastle Station  *  Northallerton Station  *  Nuneaton Station  *  Sheffield Station  *  Stratford Station, East London * Warrington Bank Quay station * Wigan North Western - WCML *  York Station

See Also * Class 01 * Class 02 * Class 03 * Class 04 * Class 08 * Class 09 * Class 10 * Class 11 * Class 14 * Class 20 * Class 24 * Class 25 * Class 26 * Class 27 * Class 31 * Class 33 * Class 37 * Class 40 * Class 43 * Class 44 * Class 45 * Class 47 * Class 50 * Class 52 * Class 55 * Class 56 * Class 57 * Class 60 * Class 66 * Class 67 * Class 68 * Class 70 * Class 71 * Class 73 * Class 76 * Class 77 * Class 86 * Class 87 * Class 90 * Class 91 * Class 92 * Class 101 * Class 108 * Class 114 * Class 117 * Class 121 * Class 127 * Class 141 * Class 142 * Class 144 * Class 150 * Class 153 * Class 155 * Class 156 * Class 158 * Class 159 * Class 165 * Class 166 * Class 170 * Class 175 * Class 180 * Class 185 * Class 220 * Class 221 * Class 222 * Class 252 * Class 313 * Class 315 * Class 317 * Class 319 * Class 320 * Class 321 * Class 322 * Class 323 * Class 325 * Class 332 * Class 333 * Class 334 * Class 350 * Class 357 * Class 360 * Class 365 * Class 373 * Class 375 * Class 376 * Class 377 * Class 378 * Class 379 * Class 380 * Class 387 * Class 390 * Class 395 * Class 414 * Class 423 * Class 442 * Class 444 * Class 450 * Class 455 * Class 458 * Class 460 * Class 465 * Class 466 * Class 507/508 * Class 3000 *

IMAGES OF PRESERVED STEAM LOCOMOTIVES

For Doc Brown's latest updates of pictures or science see https://twitter.com/docbrownchem

Doc Brown's Science Website - KS3 Science, GCSE Biology, GCSE & A Level Chemistry and GCSE Physics